Center for Hellenic Studies

 

Anastasia Giannakidou is a Professor of Linguistics and the College at the University of Chicago.  She studied classical philology, philosophy of language, and linguistics at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece, and received her PhD in Linguistics from the University of Groningen, the Netherlands.  She is the director of the Center for Hellenic Studies, and co-director of the  Center for Gesture, Sign and Language. Anastasia studies the Greek language, and has comparative work on German, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Basque, Korean, and Mandarin. She is the author of Polarity Sensitivity as Nonveridical Dependency (Benjamins), Definiteness and Nominalization (Oxford),  and Mood, Tense, Aspect revisited (Chicago)and is presently working on a new book for the University of Chicago Press, on the relation between language, truth, and our understanding of reality.
___________________________________________________________________________
Stefanos Katsikas holds a Ph.D. in History from the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), University College London (UCL). His research interests lie in Modern and Contemporary History of Greece and Southeastern Europe with emphasis on legal, political and diplomatic history. His research has focused on: a) consolidation of democratic institutions in post-conflict situations and their impact on state diplomacy and regional security; b) the role of minority and excluded social groups in the democratic process in the aftermath of ethnic and civic conflicts
___________________________________________________________________________
Alain Bresson is professor in the Classics and the History departments and he is a member of the Oriental Institute. His main research focus is on the economy of the ancient Mediterranean world, especially the economy of ancient Greece. Besides, he works on the social, political, economic and religious history of Asia Minor and neighboring islands. In the framework of this activity he regularly publishes, or republishes, Greek and Latin inscriptions from Rhodes and Asia Minor.
___________________________________________________________________________
Jonathan M. Hall is the Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities and Professor in the Departments of History and Classics, and the College. He is the author of Ethnic Identity in Antiquity (1997), Hellenicity: Between Ethnicity and Culture (2002), A Blackwell History of the Archaic Greek World, ca. 1200-479 BCE (2nd edition, 2014), and Artifact and Artifice: Classical Archaeology and the Ancient Historian (2014), as well as numerous articles and chapters on the political, social, and cultural history of ancient Greece. He is currently writing a book on Argos and its archaeological heritage in the modern era.
___________________________________________________________________________
Sofía Torallas Tovar is Professor in the Departments of Classics and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, as well as member of the Oriental Institute. Her research mainly focuses on different aspects of Greco-Roman Egypt, including the administration and the linguistic situation. As a papyrologist she has published several volumes and articles with editions of papyri and ostraca. She is curator of the papyrological collection at the Abbey of Montserrat in Barcelona, and also collaborates with the Swiss mission in Aswan for the cataloging and edition of the Greek and Coptic ostraca from Syene.
___________________________________________________________________________
For more information regarding the Center for Hellenic Studies, please contact Professor Anastasia Giannakidou (giannaki@uchicago.edu) or Stefanos Katsikas  (skatsikas@uchicago.edu).

Mailing address: Center for Hellenic Studies
University of Chicago
1115 E. 58th St.
Chicago, IL 60637 USA